Monday, July 21, 2014

bikiniarmorbattledamage:

kylemistry:

More fun Quiet shots, this time from Colossalcon. All courtesy of the talented M1Photo, who you can find on Flickr or Facebook! The guy managed to make mid-day harsh sunlight work, and any photographer knows that’s no easy feat.

A+ sniper outfit!

~Ozzie

This is such a brilliant outfit, I will be very surprised if it turns out that real snipers don’t dress like this.

- wincenworks

zagreus-taking-time-apart:

*gets gay married during the purge*

zagreus-taking-time-apart:

*gets gay married during the purge*

praesagium:

kingerock288:

girljanitor:

dharmagun:

mirkwood:

vampirefinch:

girljanitor:

image

One thing I’ve noticed that’s an interesting note of cultural differences within America is the gendering of hairstyles. I’ve included variations above of the two-braids hairstyle that, where I come from, is a common male hairstyle.

I’ve included two pictures of Snoop Dogg, who is probably for most people the most famous wearer of this hairstyle in a national/international context. Snoop of course is a bit of a dandy, with the signature long hair that’s obviously pampered and well-cared for. An important note: Snoop is from the LA area, specifically Long Beach, which is also my birthplace and hometown.

I’ve also included a photo of Willie Nelson, who’s rather famous for appropriating the two-braids hairstyle, which is generally considered to be the domain specifically of men of color. The braids are most popular among men of indigenous, mestizo, or Mexican descent, including young Black men.

For young Black men who do not perm their hair, the cornrow-braids hairstyle is a bit more common; six cornrowed braids that are then braided again at the base of the neck into two braids instead of hanging free.

image

Additionally, being a male and having your hair prepared in this style gives another message: that there is a woman who cares for you enough to take care of your hair like this, whether a mother, grandmother, aunt, wife, sister, or girlfriend. It can have the connotation of being spoiled, como “trenzcito” which means “little braid(ed boy)”; it adds a connotation of “baby boy” or “youngest son”.

Two instances of culture clash: when I first moved up north, I commonly fixed my hair in two long braids, which were almost waist length. In Cali, this is a “butch” hairstyle, or at least kinda gender-neutral. I got so many (sexist AND racist) comments about it, especially at work, that I ended up cutting my hair off an inch or two from my scalp.

Another is my ex-husband had very long hair, which I used to carefully and lovingly braid for him as part of my marianisma duties: a single long braid, the double-braid-in-one style pictured above, two sleek braids parted in the middle, and on special occasions, box braids. In contrast, my (white) partner now really doesn’t like me to do anything to his hair at all; he considers it to be kinda feminizing and/or something only to be done in private. I always end up feeling vaguely offended and rejected, but I just have to remind myself that it’s honestly a cultural difference, and that his lack of braids doesn’t reflect poorly on my care for him.

It’s really kind of funny if you think about it. I’m always imagining people see my unbraided partner at work and their pity upon him for being so unloved, before I remember this is the north and no one thinks that here. Still, it doesn’t stop me from wanting to yell, “make sure they know that I LOVE you!” every day when he leaves for work.

Reblogging from the queue because this is one of my favorite posts of all time.

And this is one of the many, many examples of why “gender” is not just some myopic thing you can “abolish”. It’s an intrinsic part of people’s cultural heritage and understandings.

that is one of the most fascinating things i ever read. thanks, OP

I really should have listened to Karnythia.

This is a good point about how race and sexism intersect when it comes to things like hairstyles.

I especially loved the part where the how it mentions that in many communities of color especially the black community getting your hair done in styles like braids, twisties,cornrows, dreadlocks, and afros and then taking the time to care for and getting it done up, is seen as something gender-neutral meaning that men and women can do it without anyone saying that “only girls/guys do that.

But with White men it’s different, and now that I think about it I’ve only heard white men talking about how certain hairstyles are considered “Feminine” or “Masculine” with them saying longer hair is feminine while shorter hair is considerably more masculine.

This explains why here in America we have this thing where women are supposed to have long flowing hair, while men are supposed to keep their hair short, thanks to white supremacy.

i appreciate braided hair in everyone now. bless this post.

(Source: a-spoon-is-born)

praesagium:

kingerock288:

girljanitor:

dharmagun:

mirkwood:

vampirefinch:

girljanitor:

image

One thing I’ve noticed that’s an interesting note of cultural differences within America is the gendering of hairstyles. I’ve included variations above of the two-braids hairstyle that, where I come from, is a common male hairstyle.

I’ve included two pictures of Snoop Dogg, who is probably for most people the most famous wearer of this hairstyle in a national/international context. Snoop of course is a bit of a dandy, with the signature long hair that’s obviously pampered and well-cared for. An important note: Snoop is from the LA area, specifically Long Beach, which is also my birthplace and hometown.

I’ve also included a photo of Willie Nelson, who’s rather famous for appropriating the two-braids hairstyle, which is generally considered to be the domain specifically of men of color. The braids are most popular among men of indigenous, mestizo, or Mexican descent, including young Black men.

For young Black men who do not perm their hair, the cornrow-braids hairstyle is a bit more common; six cornrowed braids that are then braided again at the base of the neck into two braids instead of hanging free.

image

Additionally, being a male and having your hair prepared in this style gives another message: that there is a woman who cares for you enough to take care of your hair like this, whether a mother, grandmother, aunt, wife, sister, or girlfriend. It can have the connotation of being spoiled, como “trenzcito” which means “little braid(ed boy)”; it adds a connotation of “baby boy” or “youngest son”.

Two instances of culture clash: when I first moved up north, I commonly fixed my hair in two long braids, which were almost waist length. In Cali, this is a “butch” hairstyle, or at least kinda gender-neutral. I got so many (sexist AND racist) comments about it, especially at work, that I ended up cutting my hair off an inch or two from my scalp.

Another is my ex-husband had very long hair, which I used to carefully and lovingly braid for him as part of my marianisma duties: a single long braid, the double-braid-in-one style pictured above, two sleek braids parted in the middle, and on special occasions, box braids. In contrast, my (white) partner now really doesn’t like me to do anything to his hair at all; he considers it to be kinda feminizing and/or something only to be done in private. I always end up feeling vaguely offended and rejected, but I just have to remind myself that it’s honestly a cultural difference, and that his lack of braids doesn’t reflect poorly on my care for him.

It’s really kind of funny if you think about it. I’m always imagining people see my unbraided partner at work and their pity upon him for being so unloved, before I remember this is the north and no one thinks that here. Still, it doesn’t stop me from wanting to yell, “make sure they know that I LOVE you!” every day when he leaves for work.

Reblogging from the queue because this is one of my favorite posts of all time.

And this is one of the many, many examples of why “gender” is not just some myopic thing you can “abolish”. It’s an intrinsic part of people’s cultural heritage and understandings.

that is one of the most fascinating things i ever read. thanks, OP

I really should have listened to Karnythia.

This is a good point about how race and sexism intersect when it comes to things like hairstyles.

I especially loved the part where the how it mentions that in many communities of color especially the black community getting your hair done in styles like braids, twisties,cornrows, dreadlocks, and afros and then taking the time to care for and getting it done up, is seen as something gender-neutral meaning that men and women can do it without anyone saying that “only girls/guys do that.

But with White men it’s different, and now that I think about it I’ve only heard white men talking about how certain hairstyles are considered “Feminine” or “Masculine” with them saying longer hair is feminine while shorter hair is considerably more masculine.

This explains why here in America we have this thing where women are supposed to have long flowing hair, while men are supposed to keep their hair short, thanks to white supremacy.

i appreciate braided hair in everyone now. bless this post.

(Source: a-spoon-is-born)

Sunday, July 20, 2014

stereogum:

Grimes performs at this weekend’s Pemberton Music And Arts Festival.

freckledtrash:

Disney’s The Jungle Book cast so far: Neel Sethi as Mowgli, Ben Kingsley as the voice of Bagheera, Lupita Nyong’o as the voice of Rakcha, Scarlett Johansson as the voice of Kaa and Idris Elba as the voice of Shere Khan (x x x x)

YO, THIS IS A REAL THING THAT IS HAPPENING

And not only is the cast amazing, but the film is going to be a mixture of live-action and animation (a-la Mary Poppins). Neel Seth (Mowgli),is going to be the only live-action actor and everyone else’s characters will be animated AND I COULD NOT BE MORE EXCITED.

(Source: starberry-cupcake)

effyourdrywall:

HOLY COW THAT’S MY GLOW CLOUD

underthenerdhood:

a little girl who grows up thinking all doors are automatic but actually she’s haunted by a really polite ghost